To be Published February 2–Nocturne: Poems of Love, Distance, and the Night, a callous and disinterested lover.

NocturneOn February 2, 2018, I will release my latest work, my only book of poetry.  It will be available initially only in e-book via Amazon and Kindle, but a print version will be released soon thereafter.

These poems were written from about 1985 to 1993, during which time I was an officer in the US Navy. This was a time of rapid and frequent change for me in many ways, including geographically, emotionally, professionally, and romantically.

During this time I had several lovers, who were always of good character and heart. They doubtlessly loved me more than I deserved, but I had an overpowering drive to experience as many women as I could. It was never a matter of heartlessly notching my proverbial bedpost, but honestly enjoying women for who they were. All these women were sincere in their feelings, beautiful in body and spirit, and honest with their emotions.  I suppose that what prevented me from forming a permanent attachment to any was a subtle, congenital character flaw of a need for solitude that inevitably won out over a need for a solid relationship.

As time passed, I enjoyed the hunt for women more and more and was more and more satisfied with one-night stands that I could find in local bars. My original sincerity gradually faded as I grew to identify more and more with the nightlife and the night itself. I lived for the night. Dawn was the unwelcome end to my adventures.

What stimulated my interest was my move to my first duty station at Naval Air Station Whidbey on Whidbey Island in northern Puget Sound in 1985. I fell quickly in love with the beauty of the San Juan Islands, Puget Sound, and the whole of the Puget Sound culture. I traveled as much as I could on weekends and, whenever I could, I would drop in on some small, out-of-the-way bookshop, where I became familiar with the works of local writers such as Tess Gallagher and Raymond Carver.

Something about that northwestern literary voice alleviated much of the professional tension I was feeling and I began to devour more and more of the northwestern literature, which became a stepping stone to a new literary world as I expanded my reading to the Beats, W.S. Merwin, and many others around the world. Soon I dabbled in writing poetry and found it at least as enjoyable as reading it, because it allowed me to ideas and feelings that had no other escape.

Somewhere around 1993 I began developing an interest in photography, which allowed me to express myself in other ways in which I could interact more intensely with my environment. Over the following years my love for photography supplanted my love for poetry, and then, true to my fickle nature, fiction began to supplant my love for photography, though the attraction to film and darkroom still lingers like the fond memory of a former lover.

Over the past year, I have begun contemplating my retirement from my current career and have begun to work at establishing myself as a writer for my second career. As part of that transition, I decided to collect as many of my poems as I could find and to publish them as my first serious literary accomplishment. Some of these are based on actual events; others are fiction designed to capture the spirit of the moment.

In reviewing them, I detected a theme. Therefore, I arranged them not in chronological order, but in an order that tells what I perceive as the story of my spiritual and emotional development during those years.

I made none of the photos contained herein. They are all public domain photos from online stock agencies. However, I selected each one carefully for capturing the intended spirit of the poem preceding it.

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To be Published February 2–Nocturne: Poems of Love, Distance, and the Night, a callous and disinterested lover.

NocturneOn February 2, 2018, I will release my latest work, my only book of poetry.  It will be available initially only in e-book via Amazon and Kindle, but a print version will be released soon thereafter.

These poems were written from about 1985 to 1993, during which time I was an officer in the US Navy. This was a time of rapid and frequent change for me in many ways, including geographically, emotionally, professionally, and romantically.

During this time I had several lovers, who were always of good character and heart. They doubtlessly loved me more than I deserved, but I had an overpowering drive to experience as many women as I could. It was never a matter of heartlessly notching my proverbial bedpost, but honestly enjoying women for who they were. All these women were sincere in their feelings, beautiful in body and spirit, and honest with their emotions.  I suppose that what prevented me from forming a permanent attachment to any was a subtle, congenital character flaw of a need for solitude that inevitably won out over a need for a solid relationship.

As time passed, I enjoyed the hunt for women more and more and was more and more satisfied with one-night stands that I could find in local bars. My original sincerity gradually faded as I grew to identify more and more with the nightlife and the night itself. I lived for the night. Dawn was the unwelcome end to my adventures.

What stimulated my interest was my move to my first duty station at Naval Air Station Whidbey on Whidbey Island in northern Puget Sound in 1985. I fell quickly in love with the beauty of the San Juan Islands, Puget Sound, and the whole of the Puget Sound culture. I traveled as much as I could on weekends and, whenever I could, I would drop in on some small, out-of-the-way bookshop, where I became familiar with the works of local writers such as Tess Gallagher and Raymond Carver.

Something about that northwestern literary voice alleviated much of the professional tension I was feeling and I began to devour more and more of the northwestern literature, which became a stepping stone to a new literary world as I expanded my reading to the Beats, W.S. Merwin, and many others around the world. Soon I dabbled in writing poetry and found it at least as enjoyable as reading it, because it allowed me to ideas and feelings that had no other escape.

Somewhere around 1993 I began developing an interest in photography, which allowed me to express myself in other ways in which I could interact more intensely with my environment. Over the following years my love for photography supplanted my love for poetry, and then, true to my fickle nature, fiction began to supplant my love for photography, though the attraction to film and darkroom still lingers like the fond memory of a former lover.

Over the past year, I have begun contemplating my retirement from my current career and have begun to work at establishing myself as a writer for my second career. As part of that transition, I decided to collect as many of my poems as I could find and to publish them as my first serious literary accomplishment. Some of these are based on actual events; others are fiction designed to capture the spirit of the moment.

In reviewing them, I detected a theme. Therefore, I arranged them not in chronological order, but in an order that tells what I perceive as the story of my spiritual and emotional development during those years.

I made none of the photos contained herein. They are all public domain photos from online stock agencies. However, I selected each one carefully for capturing the intended spirit of the poem preceding it.

To be Published February 2–Nocturne: Poems of Love, Distance, and the Night, a callous and disinterested lover.

NocturneOn February 2, 2018, I will release my latest work, my only book of poetry.  It will be available initially only in e-book via Amazon and Kindle, but a print version will be released soon thereafter.

These poems were written from about 1985 to 1993, during which time I was an officer in the US Navy. This was a time of rapid and frequent change for me in many ways, including geographically, emotionally, professionally, and romantically.

During this time I had several lovers, who were always of good character and heart. They doubtlessly loved me more than I deserved, but I had an overpowering drive to experience as many women as I could. It was never a matter of heartlessly notching my proverbial bedpost, but honestly enjoying women for who they were. All these women were sincere in their feelings, beautiful in body and spirit, and honest with their emotions.  I suppose that what prevented me from forming a permanent attachment to any was a subtle, congenital character flaw of a need for solitude that inevitably won out over a need for a solid relationship.

As time passed, I enjoyed the hunt for women more and more and was more and more satisfied with one-night stands that I could find in local bars. My original sincerity gradually faded as I grew to identify more and more with the nightlife and the night itself. I lived for the night. Dawn was the unwelcome end to my adventures.

What stimulated my interest was my move to my first duty station at Naval Air Station Whidbey on Whidbey Island in northern Puget Sound in 1985. I fell quickly in love with the beauty of the San Juan Islands, Puget Sound, and the whole of the Puget Sound culture. I traveled as much as I could on weekends and, whenever I could, I would drop in on some small, out-of-the-way bookshop, where I became familiar with the works of local writers such as Tess Gallagher and Raymond Carver.

Something about that northwestern literary voice alleviated much of the professional tension I was feeling and I began to devour more and more of the northwestern literature, which became a stepping stone to a new literary world as I expanded my reading to the Beats, W.S. Merwin, and many others around the world. Soon I dabbled in writing poetry and found it at least as enjoyable as reading it, because it allowed me to ideas and feelings that had no other escape.

Somewhere around 1993 I began developing an interest in photography, which allowed me to express myself in other ways in which I could interact more intensely with my environment. Over the following years my love for photography supplanted my love for poetry, and then, true to my fickle nature, fiction began to supplant my love for photography, though the attraction to film and darkroom still lingers like the fond memory of a former lover.

Over the past year, I have begun contemplating my retirement from my current career and have begun to work at establishing myself as a writer for my second career. As part of that transition, I decided to collect as many of my poems as I could find and to publish them as my first serious literary accomplishment. Some of these are based on actual events; others are fiction designed to capture the spirit of the moment.

In reviewing them, I detected a theme. Therefore, I arranged them not in chronological order, but in an order that tells what I perceive as the story of my spiritual and emotional development during those years.

I made none of the photos contained herein. They are all public domain photos from online stock agencies. However, I selected each one carefully for capturing the intended spirit of the poem preceding it.

“A Tale of Hell and Other Works of Horror” Will Be Free at Amazon on December 31, 2017.

Cover of the Kindle edition

I will be offering my e-book collection of horror shorts A Tale of Hell and Other Works of Horror” free on December 31, 2017.  To order your copy, go to my Amazon author’s page where you can find links to my other works as well.

In this collection of published and previously unpublished stories of horror, I offer a look into the minds of people who perpetrate horrors, from acts of stupidity with unintended results to cold-hearted revenge to pure enjoyment to complete indifference. Settings range from 17th-century France in the heart of the werewolf trials to the resurrection of the Aztec black arts to a medicine man’s revenge in the Old West to the depths of Hell to mob vengeance and modern day necromancy to sociopathic serial killers and on to alien worlds in the distant future.

Comments on previously published stories include:

Jay Manning, editor of Midnight Times commented in its Spring, 2006 issue: “Wolfsheim” is basically a traditional horror story that tells the tale of a small European village confronted by the threat of werewolves. If you like stories about lycans, you definitely need to check this one out. Great stuff.”

Publisher Charlie Fish of Fiction on the Web summarizes “A Tale of Hell” as a “… chilling vision of hell”. Other comments on “A Tale of Hell” from readers of Fiction on the Web:

“An intense and well paced story, cleverly leading the reader up a number of garden paths before Jack’s reality finally clarifies and appears in all its horror. The writing is focused and spare as Jack’s malevolent characteristics and idiosyncrasies manifest themselves…Overall a strong tale that lingers in the imagination…”

“brilliantly descriptive piece on man´s apparently unstoppable descent, literally into hell,…”

” Enjoyed this story. I thought it was nicely written. Started with a familiar vision of hell, but added several unique treatments; kept me interested in how it all would end. Thanks”

Publisher Charlie Fish of Fiction on the Web summarizes “Dream Warrior” as a “…powerful revenge epic about a man who visits his Mexican grandfather for spiritual guidance after a violent crime results in the death if his fiancée”. Fiction on the Web readers commented:

“quite literally a rite of passage, mystical and with an interesting payoff, one which Miguel may have to reckon with in time. some very good writing and characterisation. well done”

“…this is a rite of passage, complex and rich with significance. The cultural invocations are vivid and intense, the work of a writer in his/her full stride. The future for Miguel, who knows? The readers interest is fully engaged with what is to come…”

“Really enjoyed the story-kept me up past my bedtime reading it!”

“I loved the concept, was fascinated by the almost hallucinatory detail of legend with its fatal shadowlands.”

Reader comments on “Murder by Plastic” include:

“Chilling and brilliantly economical”

“Very well-paced and intriguing”

“Fabulous story! Five stars!”

Update on Upcoming Promotions

Phil Slattery, 2015

Note the promotion timeframe for Diabolical has changed.

I will be giving away the e-versions of three of my works over the next two months.  I will announce each in advance and on the days it is free.  Check back frequently for updates.

Diabolical:  Three Stories of Jack Thurston and Revenge:  January 1, 5, 12, 15, and 19.

The Scent and Other Stories:  January 26, February 2, February 9, and February 14 (Valentine’s Day).