Watching Stephen King on YouTube

This evening I have been working on the second edition of Nocturne with YouTube playing in the background.  Currently, I am watching “Stephen King, His Books, and Their Origins at Lisner Auditorium (published on Nov. 22, 2014 by Politics and Prose).   I always love hearing about the origins of a writer’s works and King touches on several briefly followed by a reading from Revival.  The most interesting part I have seen so far is his comment that he thinks plots are for weak writers.  He follows his characters, so to speak, and doesn’t have an idea of where a book will end, so its ending is a surprise to him.  Quite an interesting video.  I recommend it.

Tonight’s Trivia: Robert Louis Stevenson

Robert Louis Stevenson Portrait by Girolamo Nerli  (1860-1926)

Robert Louis Stevenson
Portrait by Girolamo Nerli
(1860-1926)

[From The Writer’s Home Companion, 1987]

“Robert Louis Stevenson was thrashing about in his bed one night, greatly alarming his wife.  She woke him up, infuriating Stevenson, who yelled, “I was dreaming a fine bogey tale!”  The nightmare from which he had been unwillingly extracted was the premise for the story of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

Is Stephen King Really the Greatest Horror Contributor of All Time?

Written by: Matt Molgaard The horror genre can be an interesting and fickle animal. Do right by your fans and play faithful to terror and the obsessed viewer will walk with you through Hell, whethe…

Source: Is Stephen King Really the Greatest Horror Contributor of All Time?

With your heart fixed on the Supreme Lord: Foreword, issue the 11th

Source: With your heart fixed on the Supreme Lord: Foreword, issue the 11th

Do not judge this article by its title; it’s not what you expect.  Check out this neat article from The Stockholm Review of Literature on publication, rejection, and J.D. Salinger (pictured).

Thoughts?  Comments?

The Dark Language

Working on a play in Hasting's Hardback Café, late evening, October 16, 2015.

Working on a play in Hasting’s Hardback Café, late evening, October 16, 2015.

As I was preparing to go to the local theatre this evening, I was thinking about how I can improve my writing and what distinguishes the great writers of horror.  Of course, the first two that came into my mind as being easily discernible from all others were Poe and Lovecraft.  Obviously, what distinguishes them is their use of language.  Both use very intense, muscular language with a distinctly archaic tone.   Not knowing if there a precise term already exists for this style, I decided to call it “the dark language”, because of its tight connection with the horror genre and with the horrifying in general.   For me, there seems to be something archetypal about this, arising out of the Jungian collective unconscious.   Perhaps it is just that Poe bound the Dark Language so intimately with scenes of horror, terror, and suspense, which is also bound with genres such as the Gothic novel, that the sound of it automatically brings forth societal memories of dread.

I need to finish dressing if I am to dine at my favorite local sushi restaurant before heading to the play.  Somehow, I just have the taste for something raw tonight.

Thoughts?  Comments?