Autumn Cozy on YouTube: Pub Ambience

Working on a play in Hasting’s Hardback Café, late evening, October 16, 2015.

I found this tonight while looking for something to play in the background while working on Shadows and Stars. This is exactly the kind of place where I love to write, usually with some coffee or tea in a cheap spiral notebook and a simple, but quality pen. I have tried writing while drinking and it usually doesn’t work out for me if I drink anything other than wine. Wine, though, seems a comfortable drink to have while scribbling down whatever drifts into my consciousness and having a small, good quality cigar. Since I don’t drink anymore, I have only fond memories of these places.

In fact, I enjoyed this type of place so much and am so comfortable in that environment, that I will probably be playing this video a LOT at night while I write. Night is the best time to play this video, particularly with the light downs to match those in the pub. When I play an ambience video like this, I like to make my surroundings as close as possible resemble the scene in the video, so that I can almost feel being in that place. In the daytime, I like to play videos that show a woods in the daytime, as that is what I see out my window next to where I write on my laptop.

On the other hand, I would be perfectly at home in this setting with friends, new found friends or old friends, just smoking and joking (as they say in the Navy) and getting slowly wasted, but not so wasted that I couldn’t make it out the door to a cab.

If you read my previous post, you know this is the kind of place I would love to gather a small circle of friends to discuss book reviews like Clifford Sargeant does on Better than Food.

I intend to write up some of my experiences of those bygone days, though they will be changed enough to be classified as fiction and people’s names will be changed to protect the guilty.

This video is three hours long, but if you watch the first minute you will get the idea. Try watching it sometime on a rainy night with the lights out while enjoying your favorite adult beverage or smoke.

Lovecraft’s Lack of Publicity in His Time

H.P. Lovecraft in June, 1934. He passed away in 1937.

I have read a fair amount of Lovecraft’s works and I have been watching some animated versions on YouTube lately (see the May 9 Saturday Night Special for an example; more are forthcoming). Also, within the past few years, as a soon-to-be novelist, I am becoming familiar with how critical publicity is to the success of an author.

I suppose my subconscious has been working in the background, but a thought occurred to me this morning out of the blue. Maybe why Lovecraft was not successful in his time was because he lacked publicity, at least I am not aware of any publicity campaigns he undertook.

It has been said that Lovecraft was unappreciated in his time, because people did not recognize the quality of his writing. It seems to me that the reason that the public did not appreciate might be because they didn’t know it existed. Though I am no Lovecraft scholar, does anyone know where his work was mentioned outside of the magazine in which it was currently appearing? For that matter, does anyone know of an instance where Lovecraft submitted his work to a more highly-respected magazine than Weird Tales or other pulp fiction mills? Does anyone know of Lovecraft being interviewed on the radio or in a magazine. Maybe he did all of the above, but I never heard about it. Of course, there’s the fact that Lovecraft never wrote a full-length novel (depending on your definition of a novel, of course). Then his publisher would have had to drum up some publicity for him at least.

Instead, like any lonely geek, he stayed in his room, writing his letters and stories, submitting the latter to magazines, I suppose at every opportunity, and sending the former to his friends who were also writers.

I see this same characteristic among many other writers I have met over the years. They write quality work, but because writers frequently tend to be introverts, they either avoid publicity, because it makes them uncomfortable, or, being naturally humble, they don’t have faith in their works. They lack confidence.

I wonder how the literary world would have changed had Lovecraft taken the publicity avenues that were available to him then.

I wonder how many undiscovered Lovecrafts are living now in ignominy because of their unfamiliarity with the numerous ways to publicize themselves today or that haven’t had the confidence in themselves or their works to sally forth with a novel, which might make a world of difference to their careers and lives.

I don’t want to seem unsympathetic (being something of an introvert myself), but the problem boils down to the old military adage: “No guts, no glory”. A writer needs “glory” (of some type at least) in order to be successful.

Lovecraft is a good example of that.

Comments?

Shout-Out to Writers of All Genres

Phil Slattery portrait

Phil Slattery
March, 2015

I  want to give a shout-out to all the writers (worldwide) out there for helping relieve stress and bolster the human spirit. These are particularly difficult times for everyone given the spread of the Coronavirus and its increasingly severe effects on the economy and on in life in general along with the bizarre and depressing political news that increases with each day, no matter which side of the aisle you sit on.

As I read more and watch more TV (particularly YouTube) with the increasing isolation and closure of so many restaurants and other public gathering spots, I come to realize how important a role writers play in our daily lives. Writers enable readers (as well as themselves) to escape into a more pleasant world, depending upon the genre of course. In all cases writers at least offer distractions in which the public can become immersed for a time and take its mind off the daily anxieties and fears around us. This is important, because taking our minds off our worries enables us to relax, however briefly, and allows us to heal psychologically and emotionally, both of which have healing effects on our bodies. These days, this nation and all others need healing in every sense I can imagine.

Stay strong. Better days are ahead.

Shout-Out to Writers of All Genres

Phil Slattery portrait

Phil Slattery
March, 2015

I  want to give a shout-out to all the writers (worldwide) out there for helping relieve stress and bolster the human spirit. These are particularly difficult times for everyone given the spread of the Coronavirus and its increasingly severe effects on the economy and on in life in general along with the bizarre and depressing political news that increases with each day, no matter which side of the aisle you sit on.

As I read more and watch more TV (particularly YouTube) with the increasing isolation and closure of so many restaurants and other public gathering spots, I come to realize how important a role writers play in our daily lives. Writers enable readers (as well as themselves) to escape into a more pleasant world, depending upon the genre of course. In all cases writers at least offer distractions in which the public can become immersed for a time and take its mind off the daily anxieties and fears around us. This is important, because taking our minds off our worries enables us to relax, however briefly, and allows us to heal psychologically and emotionally, both of which have healing effects on our bodies. These days, this nation and all others need healing in every sense I can imagine.

Stay strong. Better days are ahead.